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 This site enforces a strict anti-spam policy
Persistent spamming IP ranges will be blocked in full from mailing this domain

Getting inundated with spam? Need help? Click here for a free download.

Who are the worst spammers on the net? Click here to see...

Whose responsibility? - article
HOW TO LOCATE AN ORIGINATING IP ADDRESS OF SPAMMER
HOW TO COMPLAIN
DEALING WITH 'SUBSCRIBED' MAILING LISTS
spamming IP source list
Country reporting links
more waffle on spam
Bill Gates & Microsoft on spam (http://www.microsoft.com/mscorp/execmail/2003/06-24antispam.asp)

 

 

FOREWORD
Before reading through the below information, you might like to wonder on the motives of those within the profit/finance driven sectors of the world. We all know that spam is a nuisance, is time wasting and costs people money. But what is it? It is the manifestation of people who respect no-one and care about nothing except their own selfish ends. That is why this website operates a zero-tolerance policy towards such inividuals.
Who cares about doing anything about the continuing deluge of junk mail sent out by such unscrupulous people backed by equally unscrupulous Internet Service Providers? ISPs refuse to provide identifying details of those who send bulk spam through their services, claiming that their customers' identities must be kept secret by law. Bullshit. If someone from a particular company continued to bang on my door with unsolicited calls I would have every right to demand their identity from their employer as they would be invading my privacy. Likewise I am entitled to know who is behind any junk postal mail I may receive. There is no difference whatsoever. It is time that legally enforceable action was made possible against recalcitrant ISPs in place of the ongoing lip service paid to such ideas.

We know who the scum are. Let's eradicate them all from our Internet system, including recaliterant ISPs who clearly demonstrate profit motives over rational concern over the quality of their product. It is time to introduce legally enforceable international law enabling individuals to obtain from ISP's and/or hosting companies full details of users who abuse email services by spamming, by attempted phishing or by any other other attempted and illegal fraudulent manner. You can add your say by using the voting panel above.

 

RIDDING THE NET OF SCUMBAGS
You really can’t call someone a nice person who, uninvited, or in Web terms, without solicitation, knocks on your door three hundred times a day to try and get you to purchase something, or even just to try to point your attention to a certain product or products. You can however call them a scumbag.

Today, the Internet is awash with such scumbags, but just who is doing anything about it in real terms?

Some of the biggest spaming websites on the Internet continue to function today and who really does anything to prevent such abuse of the global email system? Complaints sent to the abuse departments of some of the more blatant spam tolerant hosting companies are often either simply ignored or are rejected.

The Internet is a FREE community, but it is up to those within it to protect its freedom and oust those who abuse it, just as one would oust someone who abused the hospitality of your home.

On other occasions, nic.or.kr responds to spam complaints with the message 'not spam, go fuck yourself'. Is this the sort of people we wish to see given the freedom of the Internet, I ask you?

Passing the buck — or simply avoiding responsibility, is almost a stock in trade process as far as some Internet Registration organisations appear concerned. They allocate IP ranges to ISPs as middle men, then deny any responsibility for the end use of those allocated ranges. That is simply not good enough and is the same as weapons manufacturers denying responsibility for the effects of their weapons and placing the blame on the end user.

It's a kind of subjectively empowered selective focus. If I manafacture a pocket sized nuclear bomb and give it away in comics to youngsters and then blame them for using it, well, who would YOU blame?

Internet registration authorities should be empowered with the ability to fully remove Internet services from ISPs who fail in their own responsibilities regarding fair and non-troublesome operation of service. It would appear to be the only way to stem the spam tsunami.

Sending spam is like a landlord who insists on playing loud music inside your apartment whether you want it there or not. It is a gross insult to all who receive it.

And yet a typical web search on the subject of combating spam shows the lack of direction in adequately tackling the problem of spamming ISPs. Small and large businesses alike are accused of “not doing enough” to tackle the scurge of spam mailings. This is a wholly incorrect perspective and is akin to blaming innocent civilians for being killed in a war that has little or nothing to do with them.

Preventing spam is the responsibility of the Internet Service Providers and the Internet registration authorities. This responsibility has been corrupted and denied by those who act on motives built solely on financial profits. In short, to many service operators, spam is a lucrative business and has been given a higher priority than responsible protocols.

Spammers will operate out of any country as long as they consider that they are free to do so. The fact that they might not be free to ignorantly impose themselves on others never enters their warped thinking.

They ignore complaints, sending out automated responses from their abuse department about 'doing something' while doing nothing and continuing to send bulk spam around the world. They link up and work with the biggest spammers in Korea and China. Their attitude on the telephone is often ignorant if not downright rude. They continue to force the cost and inconvenience of downloading spam onto the recipients of their junk.

Until such service providers are warned, brought to book and kicked off the Internet, the problem of spam will not be dented one bit.

Beware too that some ISPs will actively pass on to spammers details of email addresses used to communicate with their abuse departments. The writer of this article has incontrovertible evidence of this.

Complaints made directly to the US attorney offices for the states of registered business, or to other regional authorities on the basis of harassment, bring no other response than that the 'sending of spam is not illegal in the US', together with the comment that private (and accordingly costly) legal action can be taken — and this despite the fact that the sending of spam mail is an infringement of privacy and a blatant harassment of the recipients. Other countries simply ignore the complaints altogether.

It is worth noting at this point that although the sending of spam may not be outlawed in many countries, the holding or compiling of lists of personal contact information—such as an e-mail address on a computer system with the intention of sending mail shots in any format—and without the consent or knowledge of those whose details are included on any recipient list, contravenes national and internationally agreed protocols as well as laws of data protection and privacy.

Laws have been passed in the EU outlawing spam originating in EU member states. Spammers now face the real possibility of being sued and fined up to €5,000 for sending spam within Europe. Alongside this however, moves appear underway in the United States to formally legalise spamming. But just WHO is going to enforce these measures, or even take them on board?
For more info on spam laws hit the search button below. You can also download a spam information pack.

Google
The Web Newsmedianews

The below article is reproduced to show actual events. But who is taking any of this seriously?

Europe “Outlaws” Spam
Irish Minister adopts new measures & aims to make legislation EU wide
Dublin, Monday, 10 November 2003
[reproduced from www.dcmnr.ie]
Dermot Ahern T.D., Minister for Communications, Marine and Natural Resources, today outlawed Spam, or unsolicited e mails, which originate in the EU. Businesses will be able to instruct senders of Spam to cease forwarding such messages.  

The legilation also applies to text messages sent to mobile telephones owned by members of the general public

The Ministers move follows growing concern at the amount of unsolicited marketing and other material which arrives by email and text messaging.

The Minister has formally signed into law measures under the European Communities (Electronic Communications Networks and Services)(Data Protection and Privacy) Regulations, 2003. It is an EU-wide initiative. But the Minister has announced that he intends using Irelands Presidency of the EU to initiate global partnership in clamping down on spam.  

The regulations also cover the right of subscribers to determine what personal data concerning themselves is included in directories and also curtails mobile phone companies from providing data for the provision of value added services to third parties without the consent of a subscriber.   

The purpose of the Regulations is to implement the European Parliament and Council Directive 2002/58/EC concerning the processing of personal data and the protection of privacy in the electronic communications sector.

Main features of the Regulations are:
Right of subscribers to determine which of their personal data are included in a publicly available directories of subscribers.

Requirement that subscribers are informed of the purposes of public directories before they are included in them and given complete information about the ways in which their personal data can subsequently be used or accessed.

Provision for the processing of mobile location data, with subscribers consent, for providing new value added services. (For example up to now Third Parties can target material or services for mobile phone users based on their geographic location available via mobile base stations. This will now require the consent of the subscriber).  

Confidentiality provisions extended to the use of electronic communications networks to store information or to gain access to information stored in the terminal equipment of a subscriber. The use of Cookies and other devices such as Spyware are regulated and require the consent of users.

Restrictions on unsolicited direct marketing by telephone, fax, automated calling systems, email, SMS and MMS. Spam (originating in the EU) sent to the general public will be illegal. Business subscribers and other entities will also have enhanced rights regarding the prevention of Spam.

Provisions for enforcement of regulatory decisions by the Data Protection Commissioner  and ComReg, including powers for investigation of suspected breaches of the Regulations.

Minister Ahern said: "We have all suffered from spam or unsolicited emails and texts. My move today will make it illegal to spam the public within the EU without their consent.

"We live in an exciting electronic age which offers great opportunities but also requires some form of inbuilt rights for consumers. Every time we log on to the Internet, send an e mail, text someone or use our mobile phone, that information and pattern of behaviour is effectively logged. Needless to say it can be a powerful tool for business and marketing companies. Consumers must have the right to control how that information is used. These regulations deliver those rights.

"This improves and extends existing protections that apply to the processing of personal data and privacy in the telecommunications sector to all electronic communications networks and services. "

The European Communities (Electronic Communications Networks and Services)(Data Protection and Privacy) Regulations, 2003 is available from the Government Publications Office or the Department Communications Marine and Natural Resources website,   http://www.dcmnr.ie/display.asp/pg=1303

* Related item from EU-US consumer group: http://www.tacd.org/docs/?id=224

It is perhaps worth noting here that Ireland has also passed legislation allowing for the retention for up to three years of all telecommunications made by ordinary members of the public by landline, fax, email, or mobile telephone.

Meanwhile, Brazil, Korea, China and certain east European countries now rank among those willing to perpetuate Internet ignorance by continuing to send spam and to fully ignore all complaints directed to revelant IP operators.

And you can get pretty fed up with spam. Ask any English man or woman who was alive during the two world wars. You can also get pretty fed up with those IP and ISP networks who willingly permit spam to be sent—especially the ones who refuse complaints or send you mail back with a pile of hogwash in their reply. If you find this happening, report to their upline providers and also report them to as many sources as you can.

US Federal Judge Stanley Sporkin:
"[spammers] have come to court not because their freedom of speech is threatened but because their profits are; to dress up their complaints in First Amendment garb demeans the principles for which the First Amendment stands. "

Chief Justice Berger, U.S. Supreme Court
"Nothing in the Constitution compels us to listen to or view any unwanted communication, whatever its merit. We categorically reject the argument that a vendor has a right under the Constitution or otherwise to send unwanted material into the home of another. If this prohibition operates to impede the flow of even valid ideas, the answer is that no one has a right to press even 'good' ideas on an unwilling recipient. The asserted right of a mailer, we repeat, stops at the outer boundary of every person's domain. "

REMEMBER TO FORWARD YOUR SPAM:
The US Federal Trade Comission monitors the spam situation on behalf of the US government and has asked that you forward every spam you get to: uce@ftc.gov

Residents of other countries check with your own government administration.

 

 

SCOURGE
Spam mail, or unsolicited bulk promotional e-mail, has become a scourge practised by people who have little consideration for others and whose motive is pure self-interest. They also have little business learning, because they simply do not know that such a procedure will have the exact opposite effect to that they are trying so stubbornly to achieve.

Regardless of what it is and the reasons why it is sent, those who continue to flout Internet etiquette and to breach the terms of their service providers must be brought to book. A door to door salesman who continually knocks unwelcome and uninvited at the same door to try pushing his wares will eventually end up in court, be sacked or will get a bloodied nose.

 

Blowing the myth of the cute spammers
article
“This mail cannnot be considered UCE (unsolicited commercial e-mail) or spam as long as it contains a remove link ”

Sound familiar? How many times have you seen this sort of junk disclaimer added to the end of unsolicited (spam) promotional mail, only to be followed by a remove link that requires you to log onto a web site in order to remove your e-mail address from a list you didn't subscribe to in the first place?

And junk is exactly what it is. It is also an impertinent method of attempting to secure 'business'. Imagine the expense involved and the time required to visit say 500 such sites in one day to 'remove' your e-mail address from a list that has been garnished and (unlawfully) includes your own address without your consent?

Those who send out such disclaimer wording and then consider they have done or are doing the right thing should sit back and think again. And those whose interest it is to promote resonsible Internet etiquette should make sure they do sit back and think again.

Such a disclaimer is no different to someone who constantly telephones you with promotional offers but then tells you that you have to place a telephone call to a number on the opposite side of the planet if you wish to be taken off the calling list — and there are some who do :-)

The only effective and respectfully polite method of using any such disclaimer - regardless of what anybody may proscribe - is to include a valid remove link by return mail. And the operative element is valid.

How many e-mails have you received where the remove address is invalid?

To begin, you should not reply to a web based remove address if you have not subscribed to receive mail from the sender. Doing so only verifies that your e-mail address is valid. If remove e-mail links fail report the sender for spam. Don't give any leeway.

Ignoring unsolicited mail and simply deleting it from your mail box is no real solution. If you own your own e-mail addresses associated with a site domain, using filtering systems to weed out unsolicited mail is not always fully effective and quite often genuine mail gets mixed in and sent to the garbage with the rest of the trash.

If you are certain of not having submitted your e-mail address to the sender of promotional mailings you should report the sender for spamming. And sending a mail to the abuse section of the transmitted mail domain is not always effective.

Where domain names are forged, such as a falsified yahoo or lycos or some other such account, you simply get a reply from the abuse department telling you that the sender has forged the address and does not have an account with the service provider you have complained to. Again, this is not very helpful and does unfortnately indicate unwillingness on the part of the major web-based e-mail service providers to take the matter of pursuing spammers using forgery seriously.

There are several spam reporting networks.
One of the more effective spam reporting services is spamCop and you can register for either the free or the subscription service by visiting the web site
http://spamcop.net/accountadd.shtml

 

Many spammers will disguise their originating e-mail addresses by use of a non-existent name and many too will send end notes that their mail cannot be considered SPAM as long as it contains a remove link. This is meaningless. More often than not most SPAM originating mail remove links are themselves fraudulent and simply do not work. It is such abusers of the system that must be brought to book by service providers and banned from using the e-mail system for their ignorant means.

Unlike an unwelcome telephone call which can be terminated by the recipient, the unwelcome e-mail infringes on the time and expense of the recipient and can only be prevented by being cut off at the source.

 

HOW TO LOCATE AN ORIGINATING IP ADDRESS

Click here to open an IP look-up window from this site

Here are some tips provided by MSN on how to trace an originating IP address to determine the ISP where the message came from. An IP will look like this:

207.46.181.18

You usually read a header "backwards", from the bottom to the top. (* Please Note* There are a few e-mail software programs that do not follow this rule, but they are rarely used.) Look for the first line that says "Received", then start working your way up the header (line by line) until you find the first IP. Now you can take this IP to a whois website and enter it into the "IP Whois" query. This will tell you the name of the ISP that this IP belongs to.
Send your complaint to the abuse department of this ISP (abuse@<insert ISP>) along with a full-unedited copy of the message and it's header.

OTHER LOOK UP TOOLS

Global organisations

Regional Internet Registries (RIRs)

National Internet Registries (NIRs)

ICANN
Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers

ASO
Address Supporting Organization of ICANN

IETF
Internet Engineering Task Force

ISOC
Internet Society

NRO
Number Resource Organization

ARIN
American Registry for Internet Numbers

LACNIC
Latin America and Caribbean Network Information Center

RIPE NCC
RIPE Network Coordination Centre

AfriNIC (Emerging)
African Network Information Centre

APJII
Indonesia

CNNIC
China

JPNIC
Japan

KRNIC/NIDA
Korea

TWNIC
Taiwan

VNNIC
Vietnam

Asia Pacific organisations

Asia Pacific operator groups

Operator groups

APIA
Asia & Pacific Internet Association.

APRICOT
Asia Pacific Regional Internet Conference on Technologies

PICISOC
Pacific Islands Chapter of the Internet Society

APNG
Asia Pacific Networking Group

APOPS
Asia Pacific OperatorS Forum

aussie-isp
Australian Internet Service Providers

JANOG
Japan Network Operators Group

NZNOG
New Zealand Network Operators Group

PACNOG
The Pacific Network Operators Group

ph-isp
Phillipine Internet Service Providers

SANOG
South Asian Network Operators Group

AFNOG
Africa Network Operators Group

DeNOG
German Network Operators Group

EuroNOG
European Network Operators Group

NANOG
North American Network Operators Group


http://www.geektools.com/whois.php

Other Look-up tools:

  (North America, South America, Sub-Saharan Africa)

  (Réseaux IP Européens, Network Coordination Center
  Europe and Surrounding Areas. including Northern Africa)

 

 

In addition, there are currently two RIRs in formation stages, to handle South America and the Carribean (LACNIC), and Africa (AFRINIC).

 

HOW TO COMPLAIN
A simple Internet search will reveal thousands of words written by national authorities on the scourge of spam, with page after page of what is being done about it and how ‘illegal’ it is in the EU. What is more pertinent is that none of these excretia of words has anywhere any link to someone who will do something about it, at an official level. Quite simplt, no on gives a damn, but boy, it is something political that they all wish to jump onto like flies onto horseshit.

Whenever spam mail is received, do not delete it. Many service providers suggest that you do not respond to such mail and avoid using the 'remove' link as this only confirms that your e-mail address is valid. You are advised to send spam reports to the IP addresses listed in the mail headers. To learn how to do so, click here.


To report a spammer to ISPs and block the sender from other ISPs
(free service)
http://spamcop.net/accountadd.shtml
This service requires your interactive participation in that you will be asked to log onto a web site after submitting your SPAM complaint in order to follw your complaint through. The procedure only takes a minute or two. Please only use if you are prepared to participate. editor.

To learn how to report spam so action is taken:
<http://spam.abuse.net/userhelp/howtocomplain.shtml>

To learn how to interpret e-mail headers:
<http://help.mindspring.com/features/emailheaders/>

To investigate the owners of a numeric IP address:
<http://whois.arin.net/>

To investigate the owners of a domain name:
<http://www.internic.net/>

Other useful lookup tools:
<http://samspade.org/>

To download a small and very useful programme enabling you to type in an IP or web address and receive details of the hosting provider, click here.

 

Alternative procedures below

FOR MAIL WITH A RETURN MAIL REMOVE LINK

Save a copy of the e-mail message in a special folder labelled SPAM or something similar. Save only SPAM mail in this folder.

Follow your e-mail programme's instructions for viewing full original headers and copy them to the top of the saved e-mail message body and resave the message. For your convenience, copy the originating 'from' and 'reply to' addresses into the subject line in front of the original subject. This will help you identify the mail later.

Some mail servers will identify possible fraudulent transmission addresses with a header message such as 'may be forged'. Look out for this and note it.

If the mail contains a remove return mail link, use it and save a copy of the mail you send in the SPAM folder, or preferably copy and paste the content of the headers of the mail you send into the body of the above saved message.

If your remove request is returned as undeliverable for ANY reason, copy and paste the "mail undeliverable" reply into and above the main body of the saved original message.

Almost all service providers maintain an abuse monitoring system. This is normally for example, reachable at abuse@hotmail.com, abuse@excite.com, mail-abuse@yahoo.com etc. Whatever the domain name of the service provider, precede it with abuse@. Some may not have an abuse section.

Now forward a copy of the saved message to abuse@ followed by the names of the domains saved in the subject line of the message. Ensure the subject line is identical to the original subject of the offending mail before sending and include a note at the top of the message body asking the service providers to investigate the matter and to take action against the offender. If there is a forgery warning (see note 3), make sure that you make a reference to this in your message. Finally, don't forget to include your own details - a signature file, or at least your name.

FOR MAIL WITH AN INTERNET AUTORESPONDER REMOVE HYPERLINK

This refers to the links at the end of a message that send you to an Internet address and require the use of a browser. These are mostly used by newsletters or programmes you have voluntarily signed up with but can also be used by spam mailers and where they are, can be very irritating.

Again, follow the link. The bulk of these systems are provided by reputable services and you should receive a message that your e-mail address has been removed from the database. However, if the page proves inaccessible, or if you continue to receive unwanted mail despite your remove request, go to step 2.

Take a note of the hosting domain of the autoresponder (i.e., www.domain.com).

Go to a service hosting search system and enter the name. http://combat.uxn.com will provide the information you need, for instance.

Enter the name of the hosting domain in the search box and when the search results load, click on the 'more information' link. This will provide you with the name, postal address and an e-mail address for the owner of the site and also details of any hosting service maintaining the site. You should copy and past all of these details above the original offending mail.

You can then forward a complaint report to the domain owner requesting action to be taken against the offending account holder. Forward the original e-mail (include the original headers as explained above). If this fails to provide results to your satisfaction, contact the hosting service of the site and complain directly to them and send them a copy of the offending e-mail and full details of the remove link page.

 

Country reporting links

Please note that contact with these addresses may not bring satisfactory results.
Comments to:
antispam

Territory Reporting Address or URL Relevant Laws
United States uce@ftc.gov
California caag.state.ca.us/spam/ Legal > US > States
Hong Kong webmaster@ofta.gov.hk-
Germany mailbox@datenschutz-berlin.de mark for attn. Herr Holzapfel Legal
Finland vihje.internet@krp.poliisi.fi Legal
Belgium spam@privacy.fgov.be- www.privacy.fgov.be/actualites/boite_a_spam.htm Legal
United Kingdom www.informationcommissioner.gov.uk Legal
Korea spamcop@kisa.or.kr Legal
China spam@ccert.edu.cn

full whois list by country and domain
WHOIS WEBSITES
(please note that some of these links may be outdated. Please report any outdated links to the webmaster)

mil|http://whois.nic.mil
gov|http://whois.nic.gov
af|NONE
al|http://whois.ripe.net
dz|http://whois.ripe.net
as|http://whois.nic.as
ad|http://whois.ripe.net
ao|NONE
ai|WEB|http://http://whois.offshore.ai/
aq|NONE
ag|http://whois.nic.ag
ar|WEB|http://www.nic.ar/consultas/consdom.html
am|http://whois.ripe.net
aw|NONE
ac|http://whois.nic.ac
au|http://whois.ausregistry.com.au
at|http://whois.nic.at
az|http://whois.ripe.net
bs|NONE
bh|NONE
bd|NONE
bb|NONE
by|http://whois.ripe.net
be|http://whois.dns.be
bz|http://whois.belizenic.bz
bj|NONE
bt|NONE
bo|NONE
ba|http://whois.ripe.net
bw|NONE
bv|NONE
br|http://whois.nic.br
io|WEB|http://www.io.io/http://whois.html
bn|NONE
bg|http://whois.ripe.net
bf|NONE
bi|WEB|http://www.nic.cd/database/bi/
kh|NONE
cm|NONE
ca|http://whois.cira.ca
cv|NONE
ky|NONE
cf|NONE
td|NONE
cl|nic.cl
cn|http://whois.cnnic.net.cn
cx|http://whois.nic.cx
cc|http://whois.nic.cc
co|WEB|http://www.nic.co/
km|NONE
cd|http://whois.cd
cg|WEB|http://www.nic.cd/database/cg/
ck|http://whois.ck-nic.org.ck
ci|NONE
hr|http://whois.ripe.net
cu|NONE
cy|http://whois.ripe.net
cz|http://whois.nic.cz
dk|http://whois.dk-hostmaster.dk
dj|NONE
dm|NONE
do|ns.nic.do
tp|NONE
ec|NONE
eg|http://whois.ripe.net
gq|NONE
er|NONE
ee|http://whois.ripe.net
et|NONE
fk|NONE
fo|http://whois.ripe.net
fj|http://whois.usp.ac.fj
fi|http://whois.ripe.net
fr|http://whois.nic.fr
gf|NONE
pf|NONE
tf|http://whois.adamsnames.tc
ga|http://whois.ripe.net
gm|http://whois.ripe.net
ge|http://whois.ripe.net
de|http://whois.denic.de
gh|NONE
gi|WEB|http://http://whois.gibnet.gi/
gr|http://whois.ripe.net
gl|http://whois.ripe.net
gd|NONE
gp|NONE
gu|NONE
gt|WEB|http://www.gt/http://whois.htm
gg|http://whois.isles.net
gn|NONE
gw|NONE
gy|NONE
ht|NONE
hm|http://whois.registry.hm
va|http://whois.ripe.net
hn|NONE
hk|WEB|http://web.hkdnr.net.hk/hkdnr/index.jsp
hu|http://whois.nic.hu
is|http://whois.isnet.is
in|http://whois.ncst.ernet.in
id|http://whois.idnic.net.id
ir|http://whois.nic.ir
iq|NONE
ie|http://whois.domainregistry.ie
im|WEB|http://www.nic.im/exist.html
il|http://whois.isoc.org.il
it|http://whois.nic.it
jm|NONE
jp|http://whois.nic.ad.jp
je|http://whois.isles.net
jo|http://whois.ripe.net
kz|http://whois.domain.kz
ke|NONE
ki|NONE
kp|NONE
kr|http://whois.krnic.net
kw|NONE
kg|http://whois.domain.kg
la|http://whois.afilias-grs.net
lv|http://whois.ripe.net
lb|WEB|http://www.aub.edu.lb/lbdr/search.html
ls|NONE
lr|NONE
ly|NONE
li|http://whois.nic.li
lt|http://whois.domreg.lt
lu|http://whois.dns.lu
mo|NONE
mk|http://whois.ripe.net
mg|NONE
mw|WEB|http://www.tarsus.net/whois/
my|WEB|http://www.mynic.net.my
mv|NONE
ml|NONE
mt|http://whois.ripe.net
mh|NONE
mq|NONE
mr|NONE
mu|WEB|http://www.nic.mu/cgi-bin/mu_http://whois.cgi
yt|NONE
mx|http://whois.nic.mx
fm|WEB|http://www.nic.fm/register.html
md|http://whois.ripe.net
mc|http://whois.ripe.net
mn|WEB|http://www.nic.mn
ms|http://whois.adamsnames.tc
ma|http://whois.ripe.net
mz|NONE
mm|http://whois.nic.mm
na|NONE
nr|NONE
np|NONE
nl|http://whois.domain-registry.nl
an|NONE
nc|http://whois.cctld.nc
nz|http://whois.srs.net.nz
ni|NONE
ne|NONE
ng|pgebrehiwot.iat.cnr.it
nu|http://whois.nic.nu
nf|NONE
mp|NONE
no|http://whois.norid.no
om|NONE
pk|http://whois.pknic.net.pk
pw|NONE
pa|WEB|http://www.nic.pa/
pg|NONE
py|WEB|http://www.nic.py/consultas/
pe|NONE
ph|WEB|http://www.domains.ph/DomainSearch.asp
pn|NONE
pl|http://whois.dns.pl
pt|http://whois.ripe.net
pr|WEB|http://www.uprr.pr/domain/http://whois.asp
qa|NONE
re|NONE
ro|http://whois.rotld.ro
ru|http://whois.ripn.net
rw|WEB|http://www.nic.cd/database/rw/
kn|NONE
lc|NONE
vc|NONE
ws|http://whois.worldsite.ws
sm|http://whois.ripe.net
st|http://whois.nic.st
sa|WEB|http://www.saudinic.net.sa/cgi-bin/http://whois.cgi
sn|NONE
sc|NONE
sl|NONE
sg|http://whois.nic.net.sg
sk|http://whois.ripe.net
si|http://whois.arnes.si
sb|NONE
so|NONE
za|http://whois.frd.ac.za
gz|NONE
es|WEB|http://www.nic.es/whois/
lk|http://whois.nic.lk
sh|http://whois.nic.sh
pm|NONE
sd|NONE
sr|NONE
sj|NONE
sz|NONE
se|http://whois.nic-se.se
ch|http://whois.nic.ch
sy|NONE
tw|http://whois.twnic.net.tw
tj|http://whois.nic.tj
tz|NONE
th|http://whois.thnic.net
tg|NONE
tk|http://whois.dot.tk
to|http://whois.tonic.to
tt|WEB|http://www.nic.tt/
tn|http://whois.ripe.net
tr|http://whois.metu.edu.tr
tm|http://whois.nic.tm
tc|http://whois.adamsnames.tc
tv|WEB|http://www.tv/en-def-1dddb1d3105a/en/index.shtml
ug|NONE
ua|http://whois.net.ua
ae|NONE
gb|http://whois.ripe.net
us|http://whois.nic.us
um|NONE
uy|NONE
uz|NONE
vu|WEB|http://www.vunic.vu/http://whois.htm
ve|rhttp://whois.reacciun.ve
vn|WEB|http://www.vnnic.net.vn/english/reg_domain/index.html
vg|http://whois.adamsnames.tc
vi|WEB|http://www.nic.vi/whoisform.htm
wf|NONE
eh|NONE
ye|NONE
yu|http://whois.ripe.net
zr|NONE
zm|NONE
zw|NONE
int|http://whois.iana.org
gs|http://whois.adamsnames.tc
info|http://whois.afilias.info
biz|whois.neulevel.biz
su|whois.ripn.net
name|whois.nic.name
coop|whois.nic.coop
aero|whois.information.aero
ac.uk|whois.ja.net
gov.uk|whois.ja.net
net.au|whois.connect.com.au
com.au|whois-generic.ausregistry.net.au
gb.com|whois.nomination.net
gb.net|whois.nomination.net
se.com|whois.centralnic.com
se.net|whois.centralnic.com
au.com|whois.au.com
edu.cn|whois.edu.cn
museum|whois.museum
edu|whois.educause.net
org|whois.publicinterestregistry.net

 


TO MONITOR YOUR INCOMING MAIL FOR SPAM

For Microsoft Outlook and Outlook Express Users:

To set up the MSN Inbox Guardian:

1. Open Outlook or Outlook Express
2. Click Help, and then click About Outlook or About Outlook Express.

When you determine your software version information, click on the appropriate
link (or copy and paste the appropriate URL shown below into your browser) for
instructions on how to set up the MSN Inbox Guardian with your e-mail software
program:

Microsoft Outlook Express versions 4.0, 4.01, 4.02
(http://supportservices.msn.com/us/content/qanda/_spam_instructions_oe4.htm)

Microsoft Outlook Express versions 5.0. 5.5
(http://supportservices.msn.com/us/content/qanda/_spam_instructions_oe5.htm)

Microsoft Outlook Express version 6.0
(http://supportservices.msn.com/us/content/qanda/_spam_instructions_oe6.htm)

Microsoft Outlook 98
(http://supportservices.msn.com/us/content/qanda/_spam_instructions_o98.htm)

Microsoft Outlook 2000, Outlook 2000 SR-1
(http://supportservices.msn.com/us/content/qanda/_spam_instructions_o2000.htm)

Microsoft Outlook 2002 (OfficeXP)
(http://supportservices.msn.com/us/content/qanda/_spam_instructions_o2002.htm)

For other software check with the vendor or the help file.

Pegasus Mail users click here for useful mail templates. Latest versions of Pegasus Mail and Mercury Mail Server include content control facilities.

 

DEALING WITH SUBSCRIBED MAILING LISTS
If you receive unsolicited mail that tells you that you have subscribed to a mailing list and you are suspicious of or uncertain of having subscribed at all, check your Freedom of Information legislation and data protection laws and verify what rights in law you have to inquire as to how your details have been acquired and are being kept.

Information provided in response to any inquiry must be specific. It is not adequate for data controllers to simply state that you have subscribed—indisputable evidence of your subscription must accompany any answer to your request. Failure to comply with your request is itself an offence.

If the sender's address is disguised or is false, the mail is SPAM. You will need to use the methods described elsewhere on this page to locate an address to send your request to.

Pegasus Mail users click here for useful mail templates

 

SPAMMING IP SOURCE LIST
I have provided a list of IPs that send persistent spam, together with the verified complaints addresses for the source of the spam and also to any links contained in the mail. The list is not fully comprehensive of course and is being continually updated. To view the list click here.

To use the list, simply locate the senders' IP from the original mail headers, or the web address, and then search the list for them. You can then send your complaint directly to the IP and ISP concerned. You can also bill them for forced download time and wasted manpower hours if they send persistent spam and if you are prepared to utilise debt recovery services and issue lawsuits for defaulting recipients.

You can also configure your mail programme to search body or headers for the IP range or site listing and automatically forward the mail to the relevant abuse department.

Of course, ISP's are not directly responsible for sending spam and so it is advisable to make this clear in any billing you send by informing the ISP that it is their responsibility to recover billing costs from their spamming clients.

If enough people begin billing spamming ISP sources, and those people are prepared to pursue recovery action, the more trustworthy service providers may begin to keep tighter ships.


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